Workshop

Bach's Elusive "Markuspassion": Reconstruction of a Lost Masterpiece

15. September 2019, 9:00 bis 10:30 Uhr

Hannover Congress Centrum | Raum 3

Johann Sebastian Bach’s “St. John Passion” and “St. Matthew Passion” are popular and well established in concert life. Of a third, the “Markuspassion”, only Picander’s original libretto is extant. The music scholar Malcolm Bruno has prepared a new reconstruction of this aesthetically unique work based mainly on the established parody model “Trauer-Ode” BWV 198. Additional parallel arias from various cantatas replace the lacking music for arias not accommodated by BVW 198. For the lost recitatives and turba choruses, an actor speaks the gospel text, published bilingually in the edition (German and English). In this course, the editor will present this unusual approach, which allows for a flexible use in performance. Thereby, he will reveal details of the reconstruction process and address questions of performance practice and the dramatical staging of the text.

 

In Kooperation mit Breitkopf & Härtel.

 

 

Dozent/en

  • Malcolm Bruno

    Malcolm Bruno studied at the Juilliard School, the New York University and the Royal College of Music before working as Associate Director of the Taverner Consort and early music producer for BBC Radio 3 in London for 15 years, producing major recordings of Andrew Parrott. Since 2005, he has been artistic director and chair of the Norwegian ensembles Larvik Barokk and Barokksolistene. For the past 20 years, he has also been producer for major choirs in New York and Washington, co-founding New York Polyphony in 2007. As a musicologist, he is currently Scholar in Residence at Princeton University. Having edited sacred music of Pergolesi and Vivaldi, “Messiah 1741”, the early version of Handel’s Oratorio, was published by Breitkopf & Härtel in 2018.

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